England storms into Euro 2020 final, memes say it’s coming home

Get a kick out of the reaction to the big win. Also, are we seeing double, or were there two balls on the pitch at the same time?

Liam Gallagher, lead singer of the band Oasis, was one of many to tweet the line after the victory.

Since England now moves on to play Italy, Italian fans had a twist on the slogan, arguing that, “It’s coming to Rome.”

It wouldn’t be soccer (er, football) without controversy, and this game had some too. Raheem Sterling of England drew a penalty on a foul that, USA Today notes, “really didn’t look like a foul at all.” That led to the hashtag #DivingHome.

There also appeared to be two balls on the pitch at the time of the controversial penalty. Whoops. Some fans pointed out that when this same thing happened later in the match, play was stopped, but that didn’t happen earlier.

“England invented football so they can do what they want apparently,” said one Twitter user.

The game was played in London, and some tweets suggested that Queen Elizabeth II was working some royal magic with VAR, aka video assistant referees.

There’ll be plenty more social reaction come Sunday, when England meets Italy at noon PT at London’s Wembley Stadium.

Evander Holyfield vs. Vitor Belfort: Start time, how to watch or stream online, Trump commentary

Evander Holyfield and Vitor Belfort are fighting today! Alongside Anderson Silva with Trump on commentary.

Apparently, Trump will be commentating? 2021 is a helluva year.

Originally, legendary fighter Oscar De La Hoya, 48, who retired in 2009, was set to fight Brazilian ex-UFC champion Vitor Belfort, 44, in an exhibition bout. But earlier this month, De La Hoya posted a video shot from a hospital bed. He has COVID-19 and can’t fight.

“I have contracted Covid and am not going to be able to fight next weekend,” De La Hoya tweeted. “Preparing for this comeback has been everything to me over the last months, & I want to thank everyone for their tremendous support.”

Evander Holyfield, 58, agreed to step in and fight Belfort. Holyfield turns 59 on Oct. 19.

The event begins at 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT on Saturday, Sept. 11.

The event was supposed to take place at Staples Center in De La Hoya’s hometown of Los Angeles, but it’s been moved to The Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Hollywood, Florida. According to a report from ESPN, the California State Athletic Commission refused to sanction Holyfield-Belfort.

The coast-to-coast move certainly makes it more convenient for the Florida-based former president, who reportedly will be at the fight in person.

To watch the fight night on pay-per-view, go to Fite TV to purchase the $49.99 package, which includes unlimited replays until Dec. 11, 2021. Or order it through your existing cable, satellite or telecommunications provider.

To hear the Trumps’ commentary during each match, viewers will need to use the secondary audio function (SAP) on their cable box or TV set, pay-per-view provider iNDemand said in a statement.

Donald Trump is hardly new to combat sports. He’s a longtime friend of Dana White, president of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. Trump’s past involvement with hosting major boxing events at his hotels and casinos earned him a place in New Jersey’s Boxing Hall of Fame.

For the Sept. 11 event, the Trumps will offer commentary on all four of the evening’s fights. But they’re not the only soundtrack available. Viewers can pick between the Trumps narrating the fight, or regular commentators Jim Lampley and Shawn Porter.

Here’s everyone fighting on the card…

Champions League: How to watch or stream online

Barcelona attempt to get one back against a seemingly unstoppable PSG.

Kylian Mbappe and Erling Haaland are leading the next generation of world beaters as Ronaldo and Messi inch towards retirement.

Here’s everything you need to know.

Your best bet is signing up with Paramount Plus.

All the details on Paramount Plus’ online coverage of Champions League matches can be found here. Paramount Plus doesn’t just have access to this match in particular, but all Champions League matches. You’ll also be able to watch all matches in the Europa League, the second-tier European competition.

Univision has the rights to the US Spanish broadcast of the Champions League, however. You can find out more here.

If you want to watch Champions League football in the UK, our recommendation is sign up with BT Sport.

BT Sport is streaming all the Champions League matches, but it also gives you access to a bunch of other good stuff, like UFC, so it’s worth getting.

Much like the English Premier League, Optus Sport is showing all the Champions League matches in Australia.

If you care about watching soccer at all, the Optus Sport deal is a good one. Especially if you follow the EPL which, being the most high profile league on the planet, most soccer fans do.

Disclaimer: I subscribe to the service and love it. Easy access to all matches on my smart TV and works nicely with a mobile app.

Amazon’s NFL Thursday Night Football exclusive now starts in 2022

The technology giant and the NFL are bumping up the start date for their new agreement.

As per the earlier announcement, Amazon will carry 15 Thursday Night Football games as one well as one preseason NFL game. The deal runs through the 2032 NFL season.

Although Amazon has been streaming Thursday Night Football games on its Prime Video platform for the past few seasons, it was doing so in conjunction with a traditional broadcaster like Fox. The NFL’s new deal marked the first time a streaming platform would be the sole home for the games without a traditional TV partner, with Amazon saying Monday that additional production details will be shared “in the coming months.”

Carl Nassib is first active NFL player to come out as gay: What to know

Nassib, who plays with the Las Vegas Raiders, donates $100,000 to the Trevor Project, a nonprofit focused on LGBTQ+ suicide prevention.

“I just think that representation and visibility are so important,” Carl Nassib said.

“I actually hope that one day videos like this and the whole coming out process are just not necessary, but until then I’m going to do my best to cultivate a culture that’s accepting and compassionate.”

Nassib also donated $100,000 to the Trevor Project, a US nonprofit that focuses on suicide prevention efforts among LGBTQ+ youth. June is Pride Month.

Although Nassib is the first active NFL player to come out, Michael Sam, another defensive end, came out as gay in 2014. He was drafted by the St. Louis Rams in 2014 but ultimately didn’t make the final roster after playing in the pre-season.

Other NFL players, like David Kopay and Roy Simmons, came out as gay after retiring from the NFL. Simmons said he never came out during his playing career for fear of destroying his career. “The NFL has a reputation,” he once said, “and it’s not even a verbal thing — it’s just known.”

Carl Nassib is a defensive end who currently plays for the NFL team the Las Vegas Raiders. He is a five-season veteran of the NFL, having previously played for the Cleveland Browns and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

He played for Penn State Nittany Lions in College and was extremely successful, becoming a consensus All American and winning the Hendricks Award for the nation’s top defensive end in 2015. He also received the Lombardi Award as the best college football lineman or linebacker.

In March 2020, Nassib signed a three-year, $25 million contract with the Las Vegas Raiders.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said he was “proud” of Nassib for “sharing his truth.”

“Representation matters,” he said. “We share his hope that someday soon statements like his will no longer be newsworthy as we march toward full equality for the LGBTQ+ community. We wish Carl the best of luck this coming season.”

The Raiders also showed their support. “Proud of you Carl,” the team tweeted.

While some social media reaction has sadly been focused on Nassib’s coming out not being an important issue, most have universally supported the athlete.

“I am just one person,” said Nassib. “I am a lanky walk-on who is living his dream. Thank you everyone for your support.”

Logan Paul and Floyd Mayweather memes: OnlyFans and $150,000 Pokemon cards

You knew social media was going to love this fight.

Floyd Mayweather Jr. (green shorts) goes at it with Logan Paul during their contracted exhibition boxing match on June 6.

“LOGAN IS WEARING HIS CHARIZARD CARD,” wrote one Twitter user.

“Did Paul just flash a Charizard? We live in Hell,” said another.

Paul wasn’t the only one wearing something buzzworthy on fight night. Mayweather wore a hat from OnlyFans, the content subscription service often associated with sex workers.

“Logan Paul with the Charizard necklace vs Floyd Mayweather with the OnlyFans Hat this is final boss territory,” wrote one Twitter user.

Before the fight, Paul got kind of wistful.

“In 2015, I moved to Los Angeles,” he tweeted. “Every morning & every night, I’d look myself in the mirror and repeat 10 times ‘I will be the biggest entertainer in the world.’ I had no idea HOW or WHEN it would happen, but after 6 years of manifestation, it’s happening. Life is a wild ride.”

Not everyone was down with Paul’s mantra. One Twitter user pulled up the meme that reads, “I ain’t reading all that. I’m happy for u tho. Or sorry that happened.”

Another snarked, “you 5min into the fight when u realise floyd isnt a 45 year old overweight uber eats driver from down the block that u beat up in sparring.”

But some were definitely on Paul’s team.

“CONGRATULATIONS Logan!!!!” wrote one Twitter user. “But Logan baby you was already the champ before you even stepped in the ring! So very proud of you! You stood your ground the whole 8 rounds, Damn good fight!! absolutely magnificent.”

As always with one of these YouTuber fights, people pointed out that both fighters are raking the money in regardless of how well they did.

“Bro, this is all a gimmick,” wrote one Twitter user. “They came up with this ‘fight’ to make millions. They are laughing at people stupid enough to spend money on this.”

Can’t get enough Paul brothers’ fights? No fear, Logan Paul’s brother, Jake Paul, will fight former UFC champ Tyron Woodley in August.

Electrify your commute with these Fluid Freeride Black Friday scooter deals

Get some serious savings on these scooters.

Note all scooters’ travel estimates will vary depending on travel speed, terrain, rider weight and other factors.

The Cityrider is a last-mile scooter powered by a 350-watt motor with a top speed of 18 mph and a listed travel distance of 15 miles. It’s lightweight and easy to store.

The Fluid Horizon is powered by a 500-watt motor, can hit a top speed of 23 mph and has an estimated travel range of 30 miles.

More than a commuter, this scooter has two 500-watt motors with tubeless tires that never go flat. This scooter has a top speed of 26 mph and a travel distance of 30 miles.

For those wanting to go faster, the Apollo Explore can reach a top speed of 31 mph. It has a 1000-watt motor allowing riders to travel up to 35 miles on their commute.

The Inokim Ox is an excellent scooter for anyone needing a little speed in their life without the herky-jerky take-offs. It has a top speed of 28 mph and a travel distance of 30 miles. The Ox runs on a single 800-watt motor and has unique single-sided swingarms that absorb bumps exceptionally well.

The Mantis Fluid Edition is a dual 1000-watt scooter with a top speed of 40 mph that weighs 65 pounds. Most scooters that can hit that speed weigh about 77 pounds; believe me, that makes a difference. It can travel approximately 33 miles on a full charge. This deal throws in a free Cityrider scooter — a $499 value.

The Mantis Pro Fluid Edition runs on dual 1000-watt motors with a top speed of 40 mph and can travel 45 miles on a full charge, making it a great choice for long commutes. Once again, a $499 Cityrider scooter is getting thrown in at no extra charge.

The aptly-named Kaabo Wolf Warrior 11 is a beast of a scooter. It has dual 1200-watt motors, can travel up to 50 mph with a travel distance of 60 miles. Just note that it weighs in at 101 pounds. Right now, The Wolf Warrior is bundled with a free Horizon scooter — a $799 value.

The Nami Burn-E is one of my favorites. Equipped with dual 1500-watt motors, it has a top speed of 60 mph and a travel distance of 90 miles. It also has a suspension that can easily be adjusted for on- and off-road travel and its smart weight distribution keeps the front wheel down when aggressively accelerating.

The Fluid Board is powered by dual 350-watt motors and can hit a top speed of 23 mph. It can travel 20 miles on a single charge. The entire board weighs 17 pounds.

Tokyo Olympics: Watch and stream the final weekend games, closing ceremonies in 4K HDR

The Tokyo Olympics are coming to a close. Here’s how you can watch the end in 4K on FuboTV, YouTube TV, cable or satellite.

Read more: Dolby Vision, HDR10, Technicolor and HLG: HDR formats explained

The Olympic rings float in Tokyo Bay near Odaiba Marine Park, venue of the triathlon and marathon swimming events.

The Olympics started on July 23 with the opening ceremonies. The final day of the competition, as well as the closing ceremonies, will take place on Sunday, Aug. 8.

The first matches of the competition actually began three days before the opening ceremony on July 20 (July 21 in Japan).

Read more: How to watch the Tokyo Olympics

NBC is broadcasting the games in 4K HDR with Dolby Atmos sound, though not every TV provider or streaming service offers it. As always, you need a 4K TV and a compatible app or box to view content in 4K HDR.

Comcast, which owns NBCUniversal, offers those with its Xfinity X1 service the ability to watch in 4K HDR with Dolby Vision.

Cable provider Optimum (channel 200) and satellite network DirecTV (channel 105) also offer the games in 4K, though not with Dolby Vision.

Read more: 4K vs. 8K vs. 1080p: TV resolutions explained

Dish says it offers the Golf Channel and the Olympic Channel in 4K HDR in its “usual 4K channel slot” at channel 540 as well as in an “Olympics-centralized location” at channel 148. It notes that “timing will coincide with the events being covered on the Golf and Olympics channels.”

DirecTV says its 4K coverage is available on a one-day delay on channels 105 and 106. It includes footage from the opening and closing ceremonies, track and field, swimming, gymnastics, diving and beach volleyball and other coverage.

Verizon offers the Olympics in 4K to those with its Fios One service. Channels include NBC (Fios TV channels 1491 and 1492), the Golf Channel (1493) and the Olympic Channel (1494).

Read more: Best 4K TV for 2021

You can stream the Tokyo Olympic games on FuboTV and YouTube TV.

If you’re looking to stream in the highest resolution available, you can do so on FuboTV or with YouTube TV, but there are a few things to keep in mind.

YouTube TV — our go-to streaming TV service pick — has 4K channels available for NBC, NBC Sports, Olympic Channel and Golf Channel, according to The Streamable. You need to be signed up for the company’s new 4K option that runs an extra $20 a month on top of the $65 regular monthly rate. There’s a 30-day free trial of the 4K option, however, which is long enough to last through the entire Olympics. You should also note that the 4K feed isn’t available in every market; here’s the full list.

FuboTV’s home screen on an Apple TV is uncluttered and friendly.

FuboTV costs $65 a month and doesn’t charge extra for 4K, but its higher resolution feeds from NBC, the Olympic Channel and Golf Channel are only available to those in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth and Boston.

NBC has confirmed that Peacock is not streaming the games in 4K.

While it isn’t in 4K, the service is streaming some of the major games and competitions for free. This includes events such as men’s and women’s gymnastics and men’s and women’s track and field.

It is not, however, streaming the US men’s basketball games for free. For that, you’ll need to pony up for a Peacock Premium subscription, which starts at $5 per month for an ad-supported plan, or $10 per month for the Plus option that offers on-demand content ad-free.

The many NBC channels and websites broadcasting the Tokyo Olympics in the US.

NBCUniversal owns the US rights to Olympics broadcasting and is once again using its variety of networks to show competitions from the Summer Games. This includes the main NBC channel, as well as NBCSN, USA Network, CNBC, the Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA, Golf Channel, Telemundo and Universo.

Per an NBC press release, the main NBC channel will have 17 “consecutive nights of primetime coverage” as well as a live primetime show.

Read more: Tokyo Olympics: All 6 new sports explained

The pandemic continues to plague countries around the world. Tokyo is currently operating under a state of emergency, and fans are barred from attending the games in person. Officials are also asking that people not congregate on roads alongside outdoor events like the marathon, according to the Washington Post.

Read more: Tokyo Olympics: The athletes that have tested positive for COVID-19

Thank you, Tokyo Olympics, for bringing us the ‘beast mode’ we all needed

Many wanted the Tokyo Olympics cancelled, but in the end, they were incredible.

The best.

Pushing past the flimsiest steel barrier ever constructed, into a restricted area he clearly shouldn’t have had access to, Boxall ripped off his required mask and proceeded to… dry hump a fence like The Ultimate Warrior circa Wrestlemania 6?

Like I said. Beast Mode.

The best part: In the background, a Japanese Olympic official, doing her level best to provide resistance, raises her hands like a frightened gazelle and then succumbs. Slowly those raised hands are lowered, evolving into confused claps. OK, she seems to say. You’re here now. There’s nothing I can do about this. I’m just going to try and enjoy this front row seat to Beast Mode, starring Dean Boxall.

In this metaphor, Boxall is the Tokyo Olympics. Both as an event and an idea. In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic both probably shouldn’t be here. As the world reels from the effects of the delta strain and global vaccine hesitancy, this is the Olympics no one asked for. Dean, what are you doing here? Bugger off, Dean. Now is not the time.

High jumpers Mutaz Essa Barshim and Gianmarco Tamberi gave each other their gold medals. This is too much.

Me? I’m the Japanese official. We’re all the Japanese official. Nervous, unsure how to react, ultimately acquiescing to this moment completely out of our control. Even in Japan, the host country, people were protesting the Olympics. First we collectively raised our hands in passive resistance. Seconds later we were all clapping.

And we were clapping because Dean Boxall is awesome. Reckless, sure. But so awesome. The Olympics were reckless too — but also awesome.

This is what the Olympics delivers: Beast Mode direct to your screen and your heart. It’s in the business of providing iconic moments like Boxall’s. Moments that simultaneously inspire and subvert our sense of what’s possible. Weird shit, displays of pure athleticism.

Two men collapsing into one another’s arms when they realize they can share a gold medal instead of duelling to the death for it. Skateboarding girls cheering each other on, making quick friends in the face of fierce competition. Runners stumbling, falling over in potentially race-ending collisions, miraculously recovering to win races.

Incredible, awe-inspiring moments.

Maybe it’s because we live in a universe where moments like these are worshipped, contorted and shaped into GIFs, tweets and memes in an infinite social media content spiral, but it somehow feels like we’ve had more of these moments compared to previous Olympics. That these Olympic Games have meant more than we ever could have expected when we cynically, reluctantly invited them into our homes.

Personally, as a man living in Sydney, a city wrestling with strict lockdowns that could potentially last for months, the Olympics was been a salve I didn’t realize I needed. It was a welcome distraction as I juggled home-schooling, work and a near-permanent dread at the daily ritual of waiting for Sydney case numbers to drop so we can all go back outside and live relatively normal lives.

There were a million reasons why the Olympic Games shouldn’t have happened in 2021. A million reasons why we shouldn’t have watched and supported what is arguably an irresponsible event run for the wrong reasons. But it’s also equally possible that — this year — the Olympics were more useful than ever.

The Tokyo Olympics probably shouldn’t have happened because of COVID-19. But I’m also happy it happened — because of COVID-19. If that makes sense.

None of it makes sense.

But right now, sport — with its simple rules and digestible outcomes, with its warm blanket of normalcy and straightforward narratives of triumph over adversity — is maybe the only thing that makes sense.

The Olympics, much like Dean Boxall, busted its way into our homes and televisions and refused to leave. An unwelcome guest. But, like the uncertain Olympics official dealing with the uncontainable Boxall as he dry humped a fence, I’m glad the Olympics forced their way into my life. I couldn’t have done lockdown without it.

Facebook eyes sports for its next push in online events

A pay-per-view-like option for sports leagues wouldn’t be out of the question, apparently.

The next sports event you watch may be on Facebook.

The social network launched its paid online events product last summer, inviting some people running Facebook pages to use tools designed to create, promote, host and monetize virtual live events. Since launch, event hosts have received 100% of revenue from ticket sales through Facebook Pay. However, that is set to expire in August, after which Facebook may take a cut.

Facebook is reportedly targeting smaller leagues and sports events since the top sports leagues — such as the National Football League and National Basketball Association — are restricted by broadcast media rights. The social network sees potential for monetizing things outside of games, such as team practices or behind-the-scenes videos, Shaw told CNBC.

A Facebook spokesperson on Wednesday said the company’s paid online events feature is available to all publishers, and sports is one area where it’s being adopted.